Sunday, November 25, 2018

Dental Crowns for a New Smile

Crowns

Crowns are sometimes needed to save a broken or worn tooth when a regular filling won’t restore it to functionality. A crown will save and strengthen a damaged tooth. We use Procera™, one of the most advanced dental materials to make your porcelain crown. It looks very natural, so you won’t be able to tell the difference between a real tooth. And with CEREC™, we can do the entire crown procedure in one easy visit!

Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP 
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605 
Washington, DC 20037 
(202) 466-4530 
SiranliDental.com

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 3

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below is one way that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Slow Healing 

 










Have you ever noticed a cold sore or a cut in your mouth that doesn’t quite seem to go away? This can be another way that diabetes may affect your mouth. Poor control of blood sugar can keep injuries from healing quickly and properly. If you have something in your mouth that you feel isn’t healing as it should, see your dentist.

To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.


Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 466-4530
SiranliDental.com

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Tooth Abscess Symptoms And Treatment

Symptoms And Treatment Of Tooth Abscess
If you have a toothache that goes beyond mild to moderate tooth pain and reaches a level of severe, throbbing pain, it could be a sign of a tooth abscess. A tooth abscess is a pus-filled lesion at the roots of a tooth, and is caused by an infection. The first sign is a throbbing toothache that won’t go away.

At first, the tooth will likely be sensitive to chewing and biting, as well as to heat and cold. You also may develop a fever, swollen lymph nodes in your jaw or neck, or swelling on your face.

If the abscess ruptures, you’ll know because of the nasty-tasting discharge in your mouth. Although the pain may recede if the abscess ruptures, you still need to be treated by a dentist in order to get rid of the infection, save the tooth and avoid complications. If the abscess doesn’t rupture, the infection can spread to other parts of the body. This is not a problem to ignore.

Treatment will likely include draining the abscess if it hasn’t ruptured. Your dentist also may recommend that you take over-the-counter pain relievers, rinse your mouth with warm salt water, and take antibiotics. More severe abscesses may require a root canal to remove infected tissue, and the worst cases require extraction of the tooth.

A tooth abscess can get its start as an untreated tooth cavity, so the best way to prevent an abscess is to prevent the cavity in the first place by following a consistent oral health routine of twice daily tooth brushing and daily flossing. Regular visits to your dentist are important too, especially if you’ve been treated for an abscess. This allows your dentist to confirm that the infection has cleared.

The above article is from: OralB.com

Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 466-4530
SiranliDental.com

Sunday, November 18, 2018

Prevent Tooth Damage with a Custom Dental Nightguard

Stop Grinding Away Your Teeth!

Bruxism is the technical term for grinding or clenching your teeth. This is known to cause headaches and jaw pain. It can also wear away the enamel on your teeth, making them shorter or uneven, and potentially causing cracks and chips. We can create a custom nightguard in our in-house lab that will help prevent all of these problems.

Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP 
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605 
Washington, DC 20037 
(202) 466-4530 
SiranliDental.com

Thursday, November 15, 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Braces or Canker Sore

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Braces
Braces are delicate, and any foods that are sticky, chewy or hard can easily cause them to break, including:

  • ice
  • nuts
  • popcorn
  • hard candy
  • gum

Any food that you need to bite into to eat is prime for breaking braces. You can get around this by cutting the food, such as corn off the cob or rib meat off the bone, or slicing apples and chopping carrots into small, bite-size pieces. You may also experience problems eating after your braces are tightened-teeth may feel sore. The first few days are the worst, so try eating softer foods like those listed below until the soreness passes:

  • scrambled eggs
  • oatmeal
  • soup with soft vegetables or pureed or cream soups
  • soft cheeses, including cottage cheese
  • smoothies and milkshakes

Canker Sores
There is no cure for canker sores but you may be able to reduce how often you get them by avoiding foods that irritate your mouth. Spicy foods, acidic foods like pickles and sauerkraut, and citrus fruits can cause irritation. If you have canker sores, help ease discomfort by eating bland foods until your sores heal, such as: 

  • low-fat milk and other dairy foods
  • cooked, canned and frozen vegetables
  • mashed potatoes (fortify by mixing in powdered milk to boost nutrition)
  • cooked or canned fruit, including applesauce
  • hot cereals like oatmeal and cream of wheat (make with milk instead of water to boost nutrition)

If you get mouth sores, try these tips to make eating easier and speed healing:

  • Choose cool or room temperature foods.
  • Blend and moisten dry or solid foods.
  • Drink through a straw to bypass mouth sores. 
  • Eat high protein, high calorie foods to speed up healing time. For example, add protein powder to milk shakes or powdered dry milk to fortify mashed potatoes and soups.

The lists above are partial, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP  
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605  
Washington, DC 20037  
(202) 466-4530  
SiranliDental.com

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Causes and Treatment of Canker Sores

Cold Sores and Canker Sores Compared
It’s easy to confuse cold sores and canker sores.

Unlike a cold sore, a canker sore is not contagious, and it appears on the inside tissues of the mouth rather than the outer surface of the lip (which is where cold sores appear). A canker sore, also known as an apthous ulcer, looks like a small, round or oval lesion that has a white or yellowish center surrounded by red. They tend to be indented, like a crater, rather than raised, like a bump.

Canker sores most often appear on the inside of the cheeks and lips or at the base of the gum. Canker sores are not usually associated with bleeding gums, so if you are experiencing bleeding gums you should see your dentist to be evaluated for possible gum disease.

The majority of canker sores are mild. Mild canker sores are less than one-third of an inch long and usually heal on their own after a few weeks.

But major apthous ulcers, defined as larger than 10 mm in size, can take more than a month to heal and can cause scarring when they finally do heal. So it’s important to visit your doctor or dentist if you have a canker sore that has persisted for more than a few weeks. These large ulcers are most common in young adults after puberty, and they are more likely to recur than smaller sores. Older adults are more prone to herpetiform lesions, in which dozens of tiny lesions group together to form a large ulcer.

The exact cause of canker sores remains uncertain, but possible factors include an allergic reaction to bacteria in the mouth, a minor injury to the inside of the mouth due to dental work or poorly fitting dental appliances, food allergies or health problems, such as celiac disease and inflammatory bowel diseases.

Although most canker sores resolve on their own, if you have a large or stubborn lesion, your dentist may prescribe an antibiotic mouth rinse, topical paste to apply to the lesion, or a nutritional supplement if poor nutrition may be the cause of the canker sore.

The above article is from: OralB.com

Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 466-4530
SiranliDental.com

Monday, November 12, 2018

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 2

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below are two ways that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Change in Taste 












Your favorite flavors might not taste as rich as your remember if you have diabetes. It can be disappointing, but take the opportunity to experiment with different tastes, textures and spices to your favorite foods. Just take care not to add too much sugar to your food in an effort to add flavor. Not only can this affect the quality of your diet, it can also lead to more cavities. If you have a persistent bad taste in your mouth, see your dentist or doctor.

Infections 












Diabetes affects your immune system, leaving you more vulnerable to infection. One common among people with diabetes is a yeast infection called oral thrush (candidiasis). The yeast thrive on the higher amount of sugar found in your saliva, and it looks like a white layer coating your tongue and the insides of your cheeks. Thrush is more common in people who wear dentures and can often leave a bad taste in your mouth. See your dentist if you think you have thrush or any other mouth infection.

To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.


Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 466-4530
SiranliDental.com

Thursday, November 8, 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Dry Mouth or Oral Surgery & Implants

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Dry Mouth
Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging. If you have dry mouth, talk to your dentist or doctor. Dry mouth can be a sign of certain diseases or can be caused by certain medications or the result of medical treatments. If you have dry mouth:

  • don’t use tobacco or drink alcohol 
  • drink water regularly-with and between meals
  • avoid drinks that contain caffeine such as colas, coffee and tea since it can dry out your mouth
  • chew sugarless gum or suck on sugarless candy to stimulate saliva flow 
  • avoid spicy or salty foods if they cause pain in your mouth
  • moisten dry foods with soup, broth, gravy, butter or margarine, or sauce. Dip or soak your food in what you’re drinking.

Oral Surgery and Implants
Your nutrition and dietary needs following oral surgery or getting implants depends on factors including your nutritional status prior to your procedure, the extent of your procedure, how much impact there is on oral function and how long your recovery is expected to last. A liquid or soft foods diet may be required for a few days or longer, until your mouth heals. Opt for nutrient-rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy foods and lean meats, eggs and beans whenever possible since they provide vitamins, minerals and nutrients needed for healing, including zinc, protein, and vitamins A and C.
Try these foods:

  • scrambled eggs 
  • oatmeal or cream of wheat (make with milk instead of water to boost nutrition) 
  • soup with soft vegetables or pureed or cream soups
  • soft cheeses, including cottage cheese
  • smoothies and milkshakes 

The lists above are parital, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP  
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605  
Washington, DC 20037  
(202) 466-4530  
SiranliDental.com

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Overcoming Dental Anxiety

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about overcoming dental anxiety.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP  
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605  
Washington, DC 20037  
(202) 466-4530  
SiranliDental.com

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Tartar

Tartar is a deposit that forms when plaque hardens on the tooth. Individuals vary greatly in their susceptibility to tartar buildup. For many, these deposits build up faster with age. Tartar is easily noticeable because of its yellow or brown color on teeth.

What Causes Tartar Buildup
When plaque accumulates and is not removed from teeth, it can harden and turn into tartar. Because tartar buildup bonds strongly to enamel, it can only be removed by a dental professional.

Help Prevent Tartar Buildup
While tartar can only be removed by a dental professional, you can avoid tartar buildup by removing plaque. To help prevent tartar, be sure to brush your teeth at least twice daily, preferably with a tartar-control fluoride toothpaste like many from Crest, and floss once a day with a product like GlideƆ. And visit your dental office regularly for oral exams and cleanings.

Above article from: Crest.com


Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 466-4530
SiranliDental.com

Monday, November 5, 2018

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 1

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below are two ways that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Gum Disease 












Notice some bleeding when you brush or floss? That may be an early sign of gum disease. If it becomes more severe, the bone that supports your teeth can break down, leading to tooth loss. Early gum disease can be reversed with proper brushingflossing and diet. Research has shown gum disease can worsen if your blood sugar is not under control, so do your best to keep it in check.

Dry Mouth 












Studies have found people with diabetes have less saliva, so you might find yourself feeling parched or extra thirsty. (Medications and higher blood sugar levels are also causes.) Fight dry mouth by drinking water. You can also chew sugarless gum and eat healthy, crunchy foods to get saliva flowing. This is especially important because extra sugar in your saliva, combined with less saliva to wash away leftover food, can lead to cavities.

To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.


Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 466-4530
SiranliDental.com

Saturday, November 3, 2018

Dental Root Canal Therapy

Saving Infected Teeth with Root Canal Therapy

Teeth with damaged or infected roots used to require extraction, which can cause problems and should be avoided if possible. The good news is that we are highly experienced in root canal therapy.

A root canal is a way to repair a tooth by removing the tooth pulp and replacing it with a filling material. This is often needed when decay reaches the tooth nerve (or the tooth is infected), and a regular filling won’t work. Not too many years ago, the situation described above would have required the tooth to be extracted. When dentists began performing root canals, patients dreaded the procedure, and therefore the root canal has gotten a poor reputation. However, with the latest anesthetics, techniques, and technology, root canals are a manageable procedure for most patients.


Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP 
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605 
Washington, DC 20037 
(202) 466-4530 
SiranliDental.com

Thursday, November 1, 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Problems Chewing or Swallowing

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Problems Chewing
Chewing problems may be caused by tooth loss, gum disease, cavities and ill-fitting dentures, so your first step should be a visit to your dentist to help determine the cause of your problem. Meanwhile, eating soft foods (see tips for braces) can you help maintain your nutrients until you can see your dentist.

Problems Swallowing
Swallowing problems can occasionally happen, but if it persists, talk to your doctor since it could be related to something serious. Causes of swallowing issues vary and treatment depends on what is causing the problem. 

If you are having trouble swallowing, to prevent choking and aspiration avoid these foods:

  • alcoholic beverages
  • extremely hot foods and beverages
  • caffeine
  • spicy foods
  • popcorn

Depending on level of swallowing difficulty, the following foods may be included in the diet. These foods are grouped into four different categories:

  • Thin liquids that dissolve quickly in the mouth such as frozen yogurt, ice cream, gelatin and broth.
  • Nectar-like liquids where liquid coats and drips off a spoon such as nectars, milkshakes, cream soup and vegetable juices. 
  • Honey-like liquids that flow off a spoon in a ribbon like in yogurt, tomato sauce and honey.
  • Spoon-thick liquids that are thickened to pudding consistency such as pudding, custard or hot cereal.

The lists above are partial, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

Siranli Dental  
Samantha Siranli, DMD, PhD, FACP  
2112 F St. NW, Suite 605  
Washington, DC 20037  
(202) 466-4530  
SiranliDental.com